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Welcome!! My name is Paul Lappen. I am in my early 50s, single, and live in Connecticut USA. This blog will consist of book reviews, written by me, on a wide variety of subjects. I specialize, as much as possible, in small press and self-published books, to give them whatever tiny bit of publicity help that I can. Other than that, I am willing to review nearly any genre, except poetry, romance, elementary-school children's books and (really bloody) horror.

I have another 800 reviews at my archive blog: http://www.deadtreesreviewarchive.blogspot.com (please visit).

I post my reviews to:

booklore.co.uk
midwestbookreview.com
2 yahoo groups
Amazon and B&N (of course)
Librarything.com
Goodreads.com
Bookwormr.com
Books-a-million.com
Reviewcentre.com
Onlinebookclub.org
Pinterest.com
and on Twitter
(seriously)

I am always looking for more places to post my reviews.

Saturday, September 28, 2013

Extreme College 101

Extreme College 101: How to Aggressively Fast-Track Your College Degree by Applying Your Already-Acquired Life Knowledge, Eli Caplin, CreateSpace, 2013

You have been working for the past several years. You feel that now is the time to get, or finish getting, your college degree. Is there any way to get college credit for what you have already learned, thereby reducing your time in the classroom, and the overall financial cost?

There are a number of things that can be done. Did you take any professional development courses as part of your job? They may be eligible for college credit. It's possible to take an Advanced Placement (AP) exam without taking the course. Talk to your local high school to find out when the exams are offered. The College Level Examination Program (CLEP) tests cover material taught in a two-year program. Other organizations offer similar programs.

If you are already in school, visit the Admissions Office, or the office that deals with lifelong learners, and ask what sort of programs they offer. If you are looking for a school to attend, a visit to their lifelong learners office might be more advantageous than taking the usual college tour. Always be aware of "diploma mills" and unaccredited online schools.

Consider taking online courses from well-known, legitimate schools. If you have the time, take a summer course or a course over winter break. The tuition, and the time required, will be less than the usual semester-long course. Need to brush up on a course before the exam? Do an internet search for "open courseware." It's a program where top schools all over the world put some, most, or all of their courses online, for Free. The only things the student does not get are access to the teacher, and credit for the course (they are not mentioned in the book, but other places to visit for free online courses are Coursera and EdX).

Some schools may ask you to write an essay explaining why you deserve credit for a specific course. Get a copy of the syllabus, which will include the learning objectives, and incorporate them in your answer.

For anyone who has been away from school for a few years, this book is a keeper. It can be read in an hour or so, and is full of information for students of nearly any age.

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